Summit Program

 

LEAD V Summit
Thursday, March 27, 2014
Santos Manuel Student Union, CSUSB

 

Program At-A-Glance

8:00 AM: Check-In - Live Music

8:50 AM: Opening Ceremony

9:00 AM: Welcome and Opening Remarks

9:50 AM: Advocacy Address: “The Battle for Mexican American Studies (MAS) and the National Movement for Protecting Public Education”

10:25 AM: Break / “Un Cafecito” & Live Performance

10:40 AM: PANEL: “Latin@ Students and the School-to-Prison-Pipeline”

11:20 AM: Panel: “Diversifying STEM Education: Challenges and Best Practices”

12:00 PM: Lunch/Live Entertainment - Please join us in the Coussoulis Arena

1:20 PM: Announcements

1:25 PM: Featured Address - “La Cultura Cura, Cultural - Based Healing for Boys and Men of Color”

2:00 PM: Panel – “Is the Peace Corps a good fit for Latinos?”

2:40 PM: Panel - "Technology and the Importance of informal learning contexts for Latin@ students' learning and development"

3:20 PM: Break / “Otro Cafecito” & Live Performance

3:35 PM: Announcements

3:40 PM: Panel - “Common Core: Practice, Theory and implementation”

4:20 PM: Keynote Address - "Chicano Rights Movements: Then and Now"

5:00 PM: Concluding Remarks & Acknowledgements

5:10 PM: Networking Reception

 


Program Detail

Masters of Ceremony

  • Dr. Enrique G. Murillo, Jr.
    Professor of Education, and LEAD Executive Director,
    California State University, San Bernardino
  • Elias Escamilla
    Assistant Professor, Counselor
    Vice President Faculty Association
    Mt. San Jacinto Community College

Enrique MurilloElias Escamilla

 

8:00 AM: Check-In - Live Music


Continental Breakfast, Distribution of Packets and Optional Credit Registration

8:50 AM: Opening Ceremony

  • Color Guard Presentation
    Air Force ROTC/Detachment 002
    California State University, San Bernardino
  • Pledge of Allegiance
    Jesus Acuña-Perez, Commandant of Cadets, Air Force ROTC CSUSB
  • National Anthem
    Cadet Captain Carrera Lynn Allred
    Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps (AFROTC)
    California State University, San Bernardino
  • Mariachi Generation Musical

Jesus Acuna-PerezAFROTC DET. 002 Nulli SecundusCarrera Lynn AllredMariachi Generation Musical

 

9:00 AM: Welcome and Opening Remarks

  • Dr. Timothy P. White
    Chancellor, California State University
    Video Message
  • Dr. Tomás D. Morales
    President
    California State University, San Bernardino
  • Dr. Jay Fiene
    Dean, College of Education
    California State University, San Bernardino
  • Honorable Carolina Zaragoza Flores
    Consul of Mexico, San Bernardino, CA
  • Honorable Assemblymember Cheryl R. Brown, representing the 47th CA Assembly District
    Video Message
  • Dr. Julian Nava
    2014 LEAD Honorary Chair / "Padrino de Honor", Diplomat and Emeritus Professor of History at California State University, Northridge
    * Dr. Nava's participation made possible by a working partnership with the Latino Print Network.

Tim White, Chancellor - California State University SystemTomas Morales - President - California State University, San BernardinoJay Fiene, Dean - College of Education, California State University, San BernardinoConsul Carolina Zaragoza-FloresHonorable Cheryl BrownJulian Nava

 

9:50 AM: Advocacy Address: “The Battle for Mexican American Studies (MAS) and the National Movement for Protecting Public Education”


*Presentation made possible through a working partnership with the Ethnic Studies Student Organization (ESSO), the Sociology Club, the Center for Indigenous Peoples (CIPS), and the Native American Indigenous Student Association (NAISA), with funding provided by the CSUSB ASI Club Allocation Budget (CAB) and the University Diversity Committee (UDC).

Tucson continues to be ground zero in the national movement for preserving ethnic studies and protecting public education. Sean Arce, the former director of Arizona's Tucson Unified School District's outlawed Mexican American Studies (MAS) program will speak about the battle for MAS and the next phase of this struggle to save ethnic studies. Arce continues to carry on the legacy of MAS based on the concept of In Lak Ech - the Mayan philosophy of interpersonal responsibility. As a result, the Xican@ Institute for Teaching and Organizing (XITO) has been created with support from faculty at Arizona's renowned Prescott College. XITO is the evolution of the struggle to promote Mexican American Studies in school districts around the country.

  • Introduction: Iveth Diaz, Chair, Ethnic Studies Student Organization, CSUSB
  • Speaker: Martin Sean Arce, Educator/Activist, Co-founder and former Director of the K-12 Mexican American Studies Department in Tucson, Arizona
  • Moderator: Charli Eaton, Co-Chair, Ethnic Studies Student Organization, Member, CSUSB University Diversity Committee

Iveth DiazMartin Sean ArceCharli Eaton

 

10:25 AM: Break / “Un Cafecito” & Live Performance

  • Performance by Grupo Folklórico de UCLA

Groupo Folklorico de UCLA

10:40 AM: PANEL: “Latin@ Students and the School-to-Prison-Pipeline”

*Presentation made possible through a working collaboration with the Association of Mexican-American Educators (AMAE) Journal (Editors: Oscar Jimenez-Castellanos, Antonio Camacho and Patricia Sanchez) and Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College at Arizona State University.)

The Association of Mexican-American Educators (AMAE) Journal published a special issue in 2013 (Co-guest edited by Donaldo Macedo, Lilia Bartolome, Victor Rios and Anthony Peguero) focused on the consequences of the Latin@ school-to-prison pipeline. The school-to-prison pipeline is marginalizing schools, communities, and families by derailing the educational success and progress of Latin@ youth. It restricts and excludes youth from the labor market and promotes mistrust and resentment toward authority, the criminal justice system, and all forms of social control. Please dialogue with a group of scholars from across the country whose research and personal lives are working toward solutions to dismantle this pipeline.

  • Introduction / Moderator: Dr. Anthony Peguero, Assistant Professor, Virginia Tech
  • Poetry: Jesús Cortez, Orange County Community Advocate
  • Dr. Eugene Fujimoto, Assistant Professor, CSU Fullerton
  • Mario G. Galicia Jr., Doctoral Candidate, UC Santa Barbara
  • Dr. Luis Nuño, Lecturer, CSU Los Angeles
  • Alicia Pantoja, Doctoral Student, University of Pennsylvania

Dr. Anthony PegueroJesus CortezDr. Eugene FujimotoMario G. Galicia Jr.Dr. Luis NunoAlicia Pantoja

11:20 AM: Panel: “Diversifying STEM Education: Challenges and Best Practices”

*Presentation made possible through a working partnership with Novelas Educativas.

The quality of the future U.S. labor market depends on both education and job skills, and, if the United States wants to remain competitive, our ability to produce high levels of educated and skilled workers is critical to the overall performance of its participation in a global economy. The increasingly globalized economy also means that the U.S. is facing more competition as other nations increase their skills in the STEM subjects (science, technology, engineering and mathematics).
Increasing the representation of Latinos in STEM fields is therefore absolutely vital to the economic and scientific advancement in the United States, as Latinos accounted for more than 50% of our country’s population growth during the last decade. Yet only 8% of Latinos nationwide graduate with a bachelor’s degree in a STEM field.


This panel of industry experts and college administrators will discuss challenges and best practices for creating successful community college-to-four-year college pathways in STEM fields for Latino students. Read the 2013 National STEM Report.

Video: Cultivando Raíces: Diversifying STEM Education

  • Introduction: Jessica G. Mendoza, Coachella Valley High School Teacher - Department of Mathematics, and Doctoral Candidate, Educational Leadership Program, CSUSB
  • Pilar Montoya, CEO, Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers
  • Dr. Gisele Ragusa, Associate Professor, Division of Engineering Education, Viterbi School of Engineering, University of Southern California
  • Marvin Martinez, President, East Los Angeles College
  • Emanuel Pleitez, Strategist, Qlovi and Chairman, Hispanic Heritage Foundation
  • Moderator: Dr. Gustavo Chamorro, Deputy Sector Navigator, ICT/Digital Media – Rancho Santiago Community College District

Jessica MendozaPilar MontoyaGisele RagusaMarvin MartinezEmanuel PleitezGustavo Chamorro

 

12:00 PM: Lunch/Live Entertainment - Please join us in the Coussoulis Arena

San Bernardino Symphony Orchestra

Just a short walk from the Student Union, please join us in the Coussoulis Arena for lunch provided free of charge through the generous sponsorship of Watson & Associates, and a dynamic concert celebrating diverse and beautiful music of Latin American origin.

San Bernardino Symphony

Presented in partnership with the San Bernardino Symphony and through the support of the James Irvine Foundation’s Exploring Engagement grant initiative, the “Mosaico Festival” concert will feature folklorico dancers, storytelling, soloists, and even the opportunity to sing along to a tune or two.

Special thanks to the San Bernardino Symphony, the James Irvine Foundation, James and Judy Watson of Watson & Associates, and the Coussoulis Arena of Cal State San Bernardino.

Welcome comments provided by The Honorable Judith Valles, San Bernardino Symphony Board President and former mayor of San Bernardino.

1:20 PM: Announcements - Initiative for the National Museum of the American Latino

  • Dr. Reyes Quezada, Professor - University of San Diego, Commissioner-San Bernardino County Equal Employment Opportunity Commission
  • Bipartisan leaders in congress have introduced legislation to designate the Arts and Industries Building on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. as the future location of the proposed American Latino museum. Friends of the National Museum of the American Latino is seeking donations and volunteers.  Visit the website for more information.

Reyes Quezada

 

1:25 PM: Featured Address - “La Cultura Cura, Cultural - Based Healing for Boys and Men of Color”

*Presentation made possible through a working partnership with the National Compadres Network (NCN), whose mission is to strengthen, rebalance, and redevelop the traditional Compadre extended kinship network by encouraging, supporting and re-rooting the positive involvement of males in their families and community and preventing or reducing the incidence of family and community violence, teen pregnancy, substance abuse, and other oppressive behaviors.

The 16 million Latino children and youth currently in America represent a crucial segment of our country’s future workers, taxpayers, parents, citizens, voters, and leaders. More than one Latino child in three (35%) is poor, compared to one white child in eight, making them less likely to finish high school, more likely to be poor as young adults, and less likely to be working between the ages of 25 and 29. That Latino teens are currently more than twice as likely to drop out of high school, coupled with risk resultant from exposure to protracted poverty, limits the life prospects of high school dropouts.


In addition, currently Latinos make up the majority population in juvenile detention centers and prisons. Despite these profound health, educational and socio-­‐economic inequities facing Latinos, targeted funding and culturally relevant programming for this significant population is sparse, and is failing to meet its unique needs. Furthermore, any innovation in addressing these disparities requires investments that move beyond merely “trauma-­‐informed care” and generic wraparound service systems. In its place would be a “healing-­‐informed,” culturally specific approach for service delivery that is rooted in long-­‐overlooked indigenous principles and practices, as well as funding that focuses specifically on the needs of Latino boys and men.


Culturally relevant innovation and capacity currently exist, but require replication in order to fully inform the prevention field of the disparity impacting Latino and Native boys and men. At the programmatic level, La Cultura Cura, or Cultural-Based Healing, is a method for healing and healthy development which is inextricably linked to restoring one’s true cultural identity as the foundation of well-being for individuals, families, communities and society alike. Read Brown Paper - Lifting Latinos Up by Jerry Tello

Video: College Bound - Novelas Educativas

  • Introduction /Moderator: Mickey Turtle Ybarra, Native American Chaplain, Patton State Hospital
  • Speaker: Jerry Tello, Director of the National Compadres Network, Therapist, Author, Performer and Program Developer, and Recipient of the Ambassador of Peace Award and Presidential Crime Victims Service Award

Jerry TelloMickey Turtle Ybarra

2:00 PM: Panel – “Is the Peace Corps a good fit for Latinos?”

*Presentation made possible through a working collaboration with the Peace Corps, the preeminent international service organization of the United States; as well as the Returned Peace Corps Volunteers of Los Angeles (CA) Peace Corps USA

The US Peace Corps was established by President John F. Kennedy in 1961.
The stated mission of the Peace Corps includes three goals: providing technical assistance to developing countries; helping people outside the United States to understand American culture; and once back home helping Americans to understand the cultures of other countries.

The Peace Corps in its 52 year has had over 220,000 volunteers and staff and served in 124 countries. Peace Corps Volunteers now serve in some 74 countries.


In 2002 one of the major initiatives of the new Peace Corps director Gaddi Vasquez was to team with the American Association of Community Colleges to increase the number of community college students in the Peace Corps.
Much of the workforce training taking place at community colleges was exactly the type of skills and experience needed to help third-world countries. By 2004, the Peace Corps had more people working (nearly 8,000) in more countries (71) than at any time in the past 30 years.


Perhaps the PC needs more partnerships like the one with the American Association of Community Colleges to increase the ranks of Latino volunteers?


The Latino voter is now making a difference in many elections. Can Spanish surname Americans also start making a difference in helping to shape American Foreign Policy as foot soldiers for peace in far-away-lands?
In this panel Returned Peace Corps Volunteers share their motivation to serve, their experiences in the field and how did their service change their lives and shape their careers back home.

  • How should the Peace Corps reach-out to Latino youth to serve?
  • What has motivated Latinos in the past to serve?
  • Why don't more Latinos apply to the Peace Corps?
  • Did your ethnicity help to identify with the host nationals?
  • Examples of how it made a difference?

Video: Peace Corps Education

  • Introduction / Moderator: Jose Luis Sedano, Media Producer - Country Served: Peru
  • Jaime A. Castillo Verduzco, Peace Corps Regional Recruiter - Countries Served: Nicaragua & Colombia
  • Laura Garcia, Educator - Country Served: Ukraine
  • Vickie Nailing, Physical Therapy Provider - Country Served: Uzbekistan
  • Martha Ruth ( Merino) Thomas - Country Served: Brazil

Jose Luis SedanoJaime Verduzco Laura GarciaVicky NailingMartha Ruth Merino Thomas

 

2:40 PM: Panel - "Technology and the Importance of informal learning contexts for Latin@ students' learning and development"

* Presentation made possible through a working partnership with the University of Texas at San Antonio. Please congratulate Dr. Margarita Machado-Casas as the new "Director of Transnational Educational Exchange and Intercultural Relations" for the LEAD Global Network. LEAD Summit VI currently slated for San Antonio for March of 2015; with a central theme on Latino and Latin American Transglobal Educational Processes.

Latinos are the fastest growing and largest minority group in the United States. They are also the poorest and most undereducated when compared to other groups. In light of the burgeoning population, Latinos represent the workforce of the future.
Given the scarcity of minority representation in the STEM fields, the Academy for Teacher Excellence in the College of Education and Human Development at the University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) established La Clase Mágica (LCM) to provide young learners, ages 5-14, with bicultural, bilingual, and STEM opportunities to engage in playful informal learning that promotes creativity, mathematical, and scientific skills along with other forms of literacy. This community based expansive learning approach contributes to the mutual learning benefits of the different participants, young learners (protégés) and undergraduate students (mentors).

These areas are vital to success in a high-tech world, but as data that suggests there are not enough U.S. students that are interested in the STEM fields. Being so, many regions, institutions and leaders, perceiving the importance of improved STEM education to their economies, have begun to take action, and this is a current priority in education and workforce development

  • Introduction / Moderator: Dr. Margarita Machado-Casas, Associate Professor, Division of Bicultural-Bilingual Studies -College of Education and Human Development, University of Texas at San Antonio
  • Dr. Belinda Flores, Department Chair, Professor, Division of Bicultural-Bilingual Studies, College of Education & Human Development, University of Texas at San Antonio
  • Dr. Lorena Claeys, Executive Director, Academy for Teacher Excellence, College of Education & Human Development
    University of Texas at San Antonio
  • Dr. Lucila Ek, Associate Professor, Division of Bicultural-Bilingual Studies, College of Education & Human Development
    University of Texas at San Antonio

Margarita Machado-CasasBelinda FloresLorena ClaeysLucila Ek


3:20 PM: Break / “Otro Cafecito” & Live Performance

Performance by Grupo Folklórico de UCLA

Ballet Folklorico de UCLA

3:35 PM: Announcements - "Cesar Chavez Legacy"

Arthur Rodriguez

 

3:40 PM: Panel - “Common Core: Practice, Theory and Implementation”

* Presentation made possible through a working partnership with the National Education Association (NEA), which counts with more than 3.2 million members.

The Mission Statement of the Common Core State Standards states that The Common Core will provide a consistent, clear understanding of what students are expected to learn, so teachers and parents know what they need to do to help them. The standards are designed to be robust and relevant to the real world, reflecting the knowledge and skills that our young people need for success in college and careers. With American students fully prepared for the future, our communities will be best positioned to compete successfully in the global economy.


Building on the excellent foundation of standards states have laid, the Common Core State Standards are the first step in providing our young people with a high-quality education. It should be clear to every student, parent, and teacher what the standards of success are in e very school. Educational standards describe what students should know and be able to do in each subject in each grade.


In California, the State Board of Education decides on the standards for all students, from kindergarten through high school. The California Department of Education helps schools make sure that all students are meeting the standards.
Since 2010, 45 states have adopted the same standards for English and math. These standards are called the Common Core State Standards (CCSS). Having the same standards helps all students get a good education, even if they change schools or move to a different state. Teachers, parents, and education experts designed the CCSS to prepare students for success in college and the workplace.


Members of the National Education Association leadership and Minority Leadership Training national cadre will discuss, answer questions and provide insight on some of the issues and topics regarding the new Common Core state standards initiative.
What are the Common Core strands in reading, writing, listening and language?
Why are the common core strands important for Accelerating student achievement? How should educators teach, and assess with Common core Standards?


How should educators teach diverse students in the era of the Common Core?

  • Introduction / Moderator: Dr. Chuck Mendoza, Redlands Teachers Association
  • Lily Eskelsen Garcia, Vice President, National Education Association, headquartered in Washington D.C.
  • Gladys Marquez, Vice Chair of the NEA Hispanic Caucus, Educator and MLT trainer, Illinois
  • Ruben Murillo, President of the Nevada State Education Association, and NEA MLT national cadre trainer

 

Chuck MendozaLily Eskelsen GarciaGladys MarquezRuben Murillo

4:20 PM: Keynote Address - "Chicano Rights Movements: Then and Now"

* Presentation made possible with funding provided by the Intellectual Life and Visiting Scholars Committee, CSUSB Academic Programs

Dr. José Angel Gutiérrez is a pivotal figure and one of the iconic founding fathers of the Chicano rights movements. He is an attorney (Dallas TX) and Professor of Political Science at the University of Texas at Arlington; Founder of the Center for Mexican American Studies.


Dr. Gutierrez, along with Cesar Chavez, Reies López Tijerina, and Corky Gonzales, stands out as among the most important and influential leaders of the Chicano movement of the late 1960s and early 1970s.


He was a founding member of the Mexican American Youth Organization (MAYO) in 1967, one of the first student activist groups of the Chicano movement; and founding member and past president of the political third-party La Raza Unida Party, which left its mark on the political scene, challenging Democratic and Republican parties alike to court the ignored Mexican American and Latino voter.


Dr. Gutiérrez was one of many activists working to change public education on a local level in the 1960s and 70s. Born in Crystal City, Texas, and educated in local schools, Gutiérrez mobilized the community to demand equal treatment for Chicano students. He was lead organizer of the Winter Garden Project, the project that which led to the now famous walkout of 1969.
Dr. Gutiérrez has been organizer, founder and co-founder of several other organizations such as the Mexican American Unity Council (MAUC), Ciudadanos Unidos, Obreros Unidos Independientes, Becas Para Aztlán, Oregon Council for Hispanic Advancement, Northwest Voter Registration and Education Project, and Grupo de Apoyo para Immigrantes Latin Americanos (GAILA).

He has been the subject of many articles and film documentaries, including the PBS video series, CHICANO! The Mexican American Struggle for Civil Rights, and is mentioned in many Chicano history and political science books. He was also featured as an "Innovator" in the PBS documentary series - School: the Story of American Public Education.
Most recently Dr. Gutiérrez was featured in a segment of: “Prejudice and Pride: the Chicano Movement”, which was part of the PBS series - "Latino Americans."

  • Introduction / Moderator: Mary Valdemar, Vice President, Latino Faculty, Staff & Administrators Association, San Bernardino Community College District, and Co-Founder, Core Team & Volunteer Support Staff, Chicano Indigenous Community for Culturally Conscious Advocacy and Action (ChiCCCAA)
  • Speaker: Jose Angel Gutierrez, Attorney, Professor of Political Science at the University of Texas at Arlington, founding member of the Mexican American Youth Organization (MAYO), and founding member and past president of La Raza Unida Party

Mary ValdimarDr. Angel Gutierrez

5:00 PM: Concluding Remarks & Acknowledgements

  • Dr. Enrique Murillo, Jr.

5:10 PM: Networking Reception